Link to the Patien Portal

Our Staff

John R. Fleming, Jr. MD

Dr. Fleming attended the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, graduating in 1996. He completed his residency training at Fort Wayne Medical Education Program in Family Medicine in 1999, and founded Palmetto Family Practice in 1999. He is board-certified by the American Board of Family Medicine.

Cynthia S. Reese, MD

Dr. Reese attended the Medical College of Georgia, graduating in 1983. She completed residency training in Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia Hospital and Clinics in 1986. She joined Palmetto Family Practice in 2001, and is board-certified by the American Board of Family Practice.

Jodi L. Belinski

Dr. Belinski attended SABA University School of Medicine graduating in 2006. She completed residency training in Family Medicine at Self Regional Healthcare in Greenwood, SC. She joined Palmetto Family Practice in 2009, and is board-certified by the American Board of Family Medicine.

Jonathan P. Ashley

Dr. Ashley attended Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine graduating in 2005. He completed residency training in Family Medicine at Palmetto Health Richland in Columbia, SC, followed by a one year Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship. He joined Palmetto Family Practice in 2009, and is board-certified by the American Board of Family Medicine.


A Word on the Staff of Asclepius

   This Asclepius wand, often confused with the Caduceus wand of Hermes, is the true symbol of the medical profession. It dates to antiquity, and was a symbol of the Greek God of healing, Asclepius. An explanation often given on the origin of the emblem is that the serpent-twined staff originated with an early form of advertisement for parasite removal, but the snake was also the symbol of a number of deities associated with healing.
   The symbol of a serpent entwined staff appears in the biblical book of Exodus, wherein Moses is instructed to erect a brass pole with a serpent; whoever looked upon it was healed. The single serpent and staff also appear on a Sumerian vase of c. 2000 B.C. representing the healing god Ningishita, the prototype of the Greek Asklepios. Still, the more practical origin postulated above makes sense. In ancient times infection by parasitic worms was common. The filarial worm Dracunculus medinensis also called "the fiery serpent", and "the dragon of Medina" or "the guinea worm" crawled around the victim's body, just under the skin. Physicians would treat this infection by cutting a slit in the patient's skin, just in front of the worm's path. As the worm crawled out of the incision, the physician carefully wound the pest around a stick until the entire animal had been removed. It is believed that because this filarial worm infection was so common, physicians would advertise their services by displaying a sign with the worm on a stick.
   Despite the unequivocal claim of the staff of Asclepius to represent medicine and healing, the caduceus appears to be the more popular symbol of medicine in the United States, probably due to simple confusion between the caduceus and the staff of Asclepius. Many people use the word caduceus to mean both of these emblems.

© 2015 Palmetto Family Practice. No part of this website may be reproduced without the written consent of the site owner. Layout and design by SCnetSolutions.